What Is U.S. Copyright Law?

The US Copyright Law grants rights to individuals for the works they create. The US Copyright Act of 1790 has changed over the years. The current basis of US copyright law is based on the Copyright Act of 1976. US copyright law is relatively automatic. Once someone has an idea and produces it in tangible form, the creator is the copyright holder and has the authority to enforce his exclusivity to it. In other words, the person is the owner of the creation. It is not necessary that a person register their work. However, it is recommended and it can serve as evidence if someone ever violates a copyright. It is interesting to note that when an employer hires an employee to produce a work that the copyright is given to the employer. Violations of US Copyright Law are generally enforced in a civil court setting. However, there could also be criminal sanctions brought against someone who violates US copyright law. Someone in serious violation of US Copyright Law, such as counterfeiting, can find themselves on the inside of prison looking out. People need to understand the copyright symbol is not a requirement. Someone may have a copyright, yet their work may not have a copyright notice or symbol. US Copyright Law covers a wide range of things that are derived from artistic expression, intellectual or creative work. This includes things such as literary works, music, drawings, photographs, software, movies, choreographic works such as ballets and plays, poems, paintings and more. The law covers the form of expression, not the concept, facts or the actual idea of the work. This means that someone can use another person’s idea or concept and produce their own take on it. However, copying another person’s work is a violation. some things may not be copyrighted but they may be protected by a patent or trademark. Individuals who have a copyright on a particular piece of work can do with it what they will. They may choose to copy it and sell it. They may display their work or perform it in public and charge admission, or they can assign or sell the work to someone else. Individuals who have a copyright can also choose to do nothing with their work, if that is their desire. However, if someone comes along and takes the work and tries to use it in some way, that person is still in violation of the owner’s copyright. Copyrights cover published and unpublished work. Anyone who is in the creative arts arena should be very careful that they do not violate US Copyright Law. For that matter, anyone who is a fan of the creative arts should make sure they are not in violation of a copyright. Simple things like uploading, downloading and sharing music or movie files can result in serious charges and fines being brought against them. The popularity of the Internet and file sharing software has increased copyright violations. Copyright owners are starting to take a stand against copyright violators and are hunting down the perpetrators. Be careful you are not overstepping your boundaries and violating someone’s copyright law. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=152058&ca=Legal

Copyright Infringement Cases Can Teach Us To Obey Copyright Laws

Copyright infringement cases can be both costly and time consuming. Considering copyright infringement is something that isn’t as easily defined as theft or speeding, there are numerous copyright infringement cases changing the way copyright law is viewed in the U.S. By reviewing a few of these copyright infringement cases, you can get a better idea of what is, and what is not, acceptable use of copyrighted works. As a forward, however, you’ll need to know something about copyright law. Most copyright lawsuits are brought to the courts because a copyright owner has found their copyright is being used outside the copyright laws. This usually means the copyright holder hadn’t been asked for permission to use the work; or if they had, the work is not being used in an agreed-upon context or they have not been paid royalties. The copyright infringement cases, listed below, sample of what goes to the Supreme Court in copyright infringement. Feist Publications v. Rural Telephone Service Co (6th Cir. 1996) This copyright infringement case was brought to the Supreme Court in 1996 regarding the copyright of a database. The Supreme Court, in this instance, decided that compilations of data (such as in a database) are only protected by copyright when they are “arranged and selected in an original manner.” Although the level of originality needed to make the database copyright-able is not very high, the pages of a directory (such as a phone book) are not protected because the data contained therein is arranged geographically, then alphabetically. Because of this, the data was not original enough to warrant a copyright infringement charge. The competing telephone company was allowed to tap into their competitors’ database and use that data in their own work without liability. Princeton University Press v. Michigan Document Services, Inc (6th Cir 1996) This case has to do with the Fair Use law, which is defined in the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. In this case, a photocopying service was sued for copyright infringement for making “course packs” for the University of Michigan. In this case, a course pack was a group of reading materials assigned by a professor — then the course pack was bound together by a professional copy shop. In the Fair Use system, there is a system available for payment of copyright fees to publishers whose works are used in course materials. The printing shop owner refused to pay the copyright cost. When it went to the Supreme Court, they analyzed the Fair Use code and found that it was NOT Fair Use, and the printing shop had to pay the copyright costs. As you can see, copyright infringement cases are cases in which someone violates the rights of a copyright owner, as provided by 17 USC §106, or of the author as provided in §106A. These copyright infringement cases can be taken to either criminal or civil court, and can carry with it a hefty fine. Copyright infringement cases are brought upon people who violate copyrights every day. In recent times, you’ll find many copyright cases in relation to electronic copyrights — such as those you’d find on a website or PDF file, as well as other digital media such as music and audio files. It’s probable that you’ve seen copyright cases brought against the common person — such as a child or family — for downloading digital music in the form of MP3s. In the current Internet age, it’s not surprising to see so many music and video copyright cases brought to us because of peer to peer file sharing made possible by the Internet. You can be certain that until people know the rules of copyright, and downloading copyrighted material from the Internet, we’ll see many more copyright cases.

The Copyright Debate And Rss

RSS is commonly defined as really simple syndication. So, this means that any material contained in a feed is available for syndication, right? Well no, not exactly. It means that the content contained in an RSS feed is in a format that is syndication friendly, if the copyright holder allows for syndication. Offering a feed for syndication does not in fact grant any legal rights to anyone to reuse the feeds content beyond what the Copyright laws grant as Fair Use. In practice, while your feed might legally be protected, you could literally spend weeks attempting to protect the contents of your feed. Legal gray areas are introduced with Search Engines indexing feeds and RSS Feed Directories including copywritten feeds, in their categorized directories. How do you distinguish between a legitimate search engine, RSS directory and someone simply reproducing the contents of a feed for personal gain? Legally how can you defend against one and not the other? One can ask whether it is legally is it wrong to reproduce content in a feed. Morally is it wrong? Does the site have a purpose or value outside of the syndicated content? Is the aggregation of topic specific feeds in itself a value? If you use the feeds for content and label the site a directory does that make it any more legal? What about personal web aggregators? If it is for personal use,is it OK? Take a look at the following topic specific feed directories: Financial Investing – http://www.finance-investing.com or Security Protection – http://www.security-protection.net One could argue that the above sites do in fact provide value, aggregating and categorizing related topic specific feeds in a single location. In fact those in the security sector of the finance arena might find the above sites of significant value but what of the content creators? Laws and Technology Collide Most people publishing content via RSS support republication of feeds. Because the technology is fairly new, the laws and legalities are still murky. It is assumed that content in RSS is protected by copyright laws but let us not forget the Internet is global and their is not a centralized body governing what is right or what is wrong. Not only does law and technology collide the laws of different countries, those creating the feed and those displaying the contents of the feed may contradict each other. It is for this reason, I would advise that publishers using RSS to assume that the contents of their RSS feeds will be syndicated and replicated. Tips and Tricks to Protect Your Feed. That is not to say there are not things that can be done to protect feeds. At the end of the day being proactive is the best way to protect intellectual property. Part of feed protection is ensuring that appropriate credit is given, this can be arranged by including a copyright assignment in the final line of the Item Description field. Additionally you can include links back to your website in the Item description field. Use teaser copy in the RSS feed’s Item description field, linking back to your website which contains the full contents of the post. At the end of the day, protecting the contents of a feed can be daunting and limiting. Controlling your contents to ensure appropriate credit and links are included is critical. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=8458&ca=Marketing

Copyright Infringement

I’ve always been of the opinion that competition is a good thing. It encourages all of us to be better and make better products. While it might be true that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, copying someone else’s work is simply wrong. We recently came across a competitor using our sales copy. The competitor was using a web graph showing the traffic on one of our sites, along with our sales copy to promote their competing application. Digging a little further, I realized that their competing application was, in both form and function, identical to our application. The competing program contained identical screenshots, custom program icons and our help documentation. While the code of the program was, in fact, different, it was clear that our copyright had been violated. We are not the first company to have our copyright violated and once the initial emotional reaction passed, we took action. Dealing With Copyright or Trademark Violations: Who, What and Where Before reacting, it is important to do homework and research the alleged content violator. Arm yourself with information. Determining the who, what and where will guide you in taking the appropriate steps. Determine WHO is violating your copyright Research the website: do a Whois lookup to determine the site’s owner. The domain owner can be found by entering the domain into http://www.whois.com and clicking on the link that says “Whois Lookup”. If the copyright on software has been violated, check the PAD file for the author and release date. Determine WHERE the website hosting is located Determine where the website is hosted. Web hosts located in progressive countries will be more cooperative in addressing copyright violations. After determining the webhost’s location, check the host’s Terms of Service (TOS) and Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) to determine the level of cooperation you will likely receive. More often than not, a physical address and detailed information on how to report an abuse claim will be found in the webhost’s terms of service. Determine exactly WHAT violations have occurred. When determining if a copyright violation has occurred, it is important to go back to the question of what constitutes a copyright violation. Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (title 17, U.S. Code) to the authors of “original works of authorship.” This work can be literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, or similar intellectual works. Copyright protection is available to both published and unpublished works. It is illegal for anyone to violate any of the rights provided by the copyright law to the owner of copyright. It is important to note that ideas can not be copywritten, and while it may be morally and ethically questionable, cloning a software application is not a copyright violation, yet copying a helpfile is a copyright violation. Copyright protection exists from the time the work is created in fixed form. The copyright in the work of authorship immediately becomes the property of the author who created the work. Only the author or those deriving their rights through the author can rightfully claim copyright. Evaluate the violator’s work to determine if text, graphics or any of the program or website’s artistic qualities are the same as your creative works. Print hard copies of any documents and save electronic versions of web pages and executables. Capture screenshots of offenses, save documentation or the Help file that contains any duplications of text. Enter the URL of the offending website into http://www.archive.org to see the website’s history and determine a timeline during which violations occurred. Look and feel can be subjective, try to focus on obvious or flagrant violations. Copied text or Help files is obvious when filing a complaint with web hosts or other third parties. What is Next? If you feel your copyright has, in fact, been violated there are a number of steps that you can take. Contacting third party service providers is a good starting point. Make a list of the providers with whom you can contact to report the violations. 1. Hosting 2. Online Ordering 3. If Software, Download Sites 4. Associations or Organizations Aside from service providers, consider using existing relationships with parties who have a mutual interest or relationship with the other party. Often, knowing key people can result in a rapid response and increased dialogue with the purported offender. Send simultaneous emails to each of the parties identified. Include details of the violation; using a PDF that displays screen captures or copies of text violations with website pointers is helpful. In the email, explain the action you wish to occur. If you want the web host to remove the website, say so. Also, ask that they keep you apprised of the situation. In most cases you will receive responses from webhosts or registration services that require you to provide additional details so that the infringement can be investigated. It may seem obvious to the copyright holder, but the web hosts typically have a contractual agreement with their clients and are legally obligated to research any infringements before removing hosting or registration services. Send a Cease and Desist letter and an email detailing that a copyright has been violated, include a reasonable deadline by which the offending copy or application should be removed. It is not necessary to provide the offender the details of the violation, as it is likely they are already aware of the offenses that have occurred. These actions will generally open a dialogue with the offender. If the offender ignores requests to remove the material that infringes on your copyright, pursue action with third party services. This will likely get the offender’s attention. Artists, developers, and writers all work hard to create unique material and copyrights should be respected by all. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=5340&ca=Marketing

What Is U.S. Copyright Law?

The US Copyright Law grants rights to individuals for the works they create. The US Copyright Act of 1790 has changed over the years. The current basis of US copyright law is based on the Copyright Act of 1976. US copyright law is relatively automatic. Once someone has an idea and produces it in tangible form, the creator is the copyright holder and has the authority to enforce his exclusivity to it. In other words, the person is the owner of the creation. It is not necessary that a person register their work. However, it is recommended and it can serve as evidence if someone ever violates a copyright. It is interesting to note that when an employer hires an employee to produce a work that the copyright is given to the employer. Violations of US Copyright Law are generally enforced in a civil court setting. However, there could also be criminal sanctions brought against someone who violates US copyright law. Someone in serious violation of US Copyright Law, such as counterfeiting, can find themselves on the inside of prison looking out. People need to understand the copyright symbol is not a requirement. Someone may have a copyright, yet their work may not have a copyright notice or symbol. US Copyright Law covers a wide range of things that are derived from artistic expression, intellectual or creative work. This includes things such as literary works, music, drawings, photographs, software, movies, choreographic works such as ballets and plays, poems, paintings and more. The law covers the form of expression, not the concept, facts or the actual idea of the work. This means that someone can use another person’s idea or concept and produce their own take on it. However, copying another person’s work is a violation. some things may not be copyrighted but they may be protected by a patent or trademark. Individuals who have a copyright on a particular piece of work can do with it what they will. They may choose to copy it and sell it. They may display their work or perform it in public and charge admission, or they can assign or sell the work to someone else. Individuals who have a copyright can also choose to do nothing with their work, if that is their desire. However, if someone comes along and takes the work and tries to use it in some way, that person is still in violation of the owner’s copyright. Copyrights cover published and unpublished work. Anyone who is in the creative arts arena should be very careful that they do not violate US Copyright Law. For that matter, anyone who is a fan of the creative arts should make sure they are not in violation of a copyright. Simple things like uploading, downloading and sharing music or movie files can result in serious charges and fines being brought against them. The popularity of the Internet and file sharing software has increased copyright violations. Copyright owners are starting to take a stand against copyright violators and are hunting down the perpetrators. Be careful you are not overstepping your boundaries and violating someone’s copyright law. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=152058&ca=Legal

Legal Copyright Eligibility For Copyright Protection

Copyright infringement cases can be both costly and time consuming. Considering copyright infringement is something that isn’t as easily defined as theft or speeding, there are numerous copyright infringement cases changing the way copyright law is viewed in the U.S. By reviewing a few of these copyright infringement cases, you can get a better idea of what is, and what is not, acceptable use of copyrighted works. As a forward, however, you’ll need to know something about copyright law. Most copyright lawsuits are brought to the courts because a copyright owner has found their copyright is being used outside the copyright laws. This usually means the copyright holder hadn’t been asked for permission to use the work; or if they had, the work is not being used in an agreed-upon context or they have not been paid royalties. The copyright infringement cases, listed below, sample of what goes to the Supreme Court in copyright infringement. Feist Publications v. Rural Telephone Service Co (6th Cir. 1996) This copyright infringement case was brought to the Supreme Court in 1996 regarding the copyright of a database. The Supreme Court, in this instance, decided that compilations of data (such as in a database) are only protected by copyright when they are “arranged and selected in an original manner.” Although the level of originality needed to make the database copyright-able is not very high, the pages of a directory (such as a phone book) are not protected because the data contained therein is arranged geographically, then alphabetically. Because of this, the data was not original enough to warrant a copyright infringement charge. The competing telephone company was allowed to tap into their competitors’ database and use that data in their own work without liability. Princeton University Press v. Michigan Document Services, Inc (6th Cir 1996) This case has to do with the Fair Use law, which is defined in the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. In this case, a photocopying service was sued for copyright infringement for making “course packs” for the University of Michigan. In this case, a course pack was a group of reading materials assigned by a professor — then the course pack was bound together by a professional copy shop. In the Fair Use system, there is a system available for payment of copyright fees to publishers whose works are used in course materials. The printing shop owner refused to pay the copyright cost. When it went to the Supreme Court, they analyzed the Fair Use code and found that it was NOT Fair Use, and the printing shop had to pay the copyright costs. As you can see, copyright infringement cases are cases in which someone violates the rights of a copyright owner, as provided by 17 USC §106, or of the author as provided in §106A. These copyright infringement cases can be taken to either criminal or civil court, and can carry with it a hefty fine. Copyright infringement cases are brought upon people who violate copyrights every day. In recent times, you’ll find many copyright cases in relation to electronic copyrights — such as those you’d find on a website or PDF file, as well as other digital media such as music and audio files. It’s probable that you’ve seen copyright cases brought against the common person — such as a child or family — for downloading digital music in the form of MP3s. In the current Internet age, it’s not surprising to see so many music and video copyright cases brought to us because of peer to peer file sharing made possible by the Internet. You can be certain that until people know the rules of copyright, and downloading copyrighted material from the Internet, we’ll see many more copyright cases. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=155732&ca=Legal

Copyright Infringement Cases Can Teach Us To Obey Copyright Lawsx

Copyright infringement cases can be both costly and time consuming. Considering copyright infringement is something that isn’t as easily defined as theft or speeding, there are numerous copyright infringement cases changing the way copyright law is viewed in the U.S. By reviewing a few of these copyright infringement cases, you can get a better idea of what is, and what is not, acceptable use of copyrighted works. As a forward, however, you’ll need to know something about copyright law. Most copyright lawsuits are brought to the courts because a copyright owner has found their copyright is being used outside the copyright laws. This usually means the copyright holder hadn’t been asked for permission to use the work; or if they had, the work is not being used in an agreed-upon context or they have not been paid royalties. The copyright infringement cases, listed below, sample of what goes to the Supreme Court in copyright infringement. Feist Publications v. Rural Telephone Service Co (6th Cir. 1996) This copyright infringement case was brought to the Supreme Court in 1996 regarding the copyright of a database. The Supreme Court, in this instance, decided that compilations of data (such as in a database) are only protected by copyright when they are “arranged and selected in an original manner.” Although the level of originality needed to make the database copyright-able is not very high, the pages of a directory (such as a phone book) are not protected because the data contained therein is arranged geographically, then alphabetically. Because of this, the data was not original enough to warrant a copyright infringement charge. The competing telephone company was allowed to tap into their competitors’ database and use that data in their own work without liability. Princeton University Press v. Michigan Document Services, Inc (6th Cir 1996) This case has to do with the Fair Use law, which is defined in the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. In this case, a photocopying service was sued for copyright infringement for making “course packs” for the University of Michigan. In this case, a course pack was a group of reading materials assigned by a professor — then the course pack was bound together by a professional copy shop. In the Fair Use system, there is a system available for payment of copyright fees to publishers whose works are used in course materials. The printing shop owner refused to pay the copyright cost. When it went to the Supreme Court, they analyzed the Fair Use code and found that it was NOT Fair Use, and the printing shop had to pay the copyright costs. As you can see, copyright infringement cases are cases in which someone violates the rights of a copyright owner, as provided by 17 USC §106, or of the author as provided in §106A. These copyright infringement cases can be taken to either criminal or civil court, and can carry with it a hefty fine. Copyright infringement cases are brought upon people who violate copyrights every day. In recent times, you’ll find many copyright cases in relation to electronic copyrights — such as those you’d find on a website or PDF file, as well as other digital media such as music and audio files. It’s probable that you’ve seen copyright cases brought against the common person — such as a child or family — for downloading digital music in the form of MP3s. In the current Internet age, it’s not surprising to see so many music and video copyright cases brought to us because of peer to peer file sharing made possible by the Internet. You can be certain that until people know the rules of copyright, and downloading copyrighted material from the Internet, we’ll see many more copyright cases. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=155732&ca=Legal

Engaging Attorneys for Copyright and Patent

The term “copyright” is not difficult to understand by laymen but many people are not cognizant with copyright law and patent. You will need to consult an attorney to assist you in completing the paperwork for the protection of your patented or copyrighted material.

While looking for an attorney, it is better to find a relevant professional since there are all kinds of attorneys, some practice copyright law for music and others maintain their focus on articles, books and other types of writing. People who own intellectual property can have them protected through different types of copyrights. It is advisable to make the right choice of a copyright by seeking advice from several attorneys.

Often, it is a good idea to protect yourself from intellectual property theft by subscribing to a patent for your idea or product. Due to complex procedures involved, it is not easy to patent an idea or product by yourself requiring understanding of patent law. It is good to have advice from experts who could fill out the incredibly specific paperwork. Skilled attorneys can appeal to the patent office more effectively compared to laymen who can face a hard time.

Patent law issues are of many different types like copyright. For example, if your firm manufactures aircraft products, the concerned patent attorneys in the area with background in aerodynamics can help you out. It is important to find a patent lawyer who fully understands and appreciates your ideas and plans.

When you deal with copyright and patent lawyers, it will also depend on how smart you are as they might not always have that much experience which they are presenting in front of you. If you are lacking understanding of legal issues, then it will not be easy for you to find an effective attorney and to judge their integrity since many individuals can fleece you easily.

One should ask for references from the lawyer to check his reliability. References need not be many but they can still help make your mind about an attorney’s reputation. Who could know more about an attorney’s efficiency more than the people who hire them?

It is important to understand that not all attorneys carry same skill level. The fees charged by them also vary hence you should ask for price quotes from the attorneys to check which are affordable for your company or family. Once you balance the costs with the available services, you will be able to decide which one is right for you.

How Trademark Law Can Protect Your Visual Art: Stop Signing Your Name, and Start Branding Your Art

For every artist, there comes that moment when the work of art is finished and you can finally exhale. You take a step back and you look upon your now-completed work – the culmination of endless nights awake and working – for the first time. You find yourself smiling. Then you dab your paint brush into that damp towel one last time, preparing to run a familiar stroke along the edge of the canvas…triumphantly, you sign your name. Your signature marks your territory; it lays claim to your most intimate reflections. It is a crucial addition to your art. Art within art. You deserve congratulations for being an artist, and you deserve thanks for contributing your creations to our history. But let me to give you one piece of advice…

Stop merely signing your name, and start branding your art.

Your signature is much more than a source of personal gratification. It is a source of revenue and source of protection that all artists – including you – must take advantage of. As an artist, you have the right to claim your art as yours. After all, you are the one who created it, the one who dreamed it. Your art is everything to you. You wouldn’t allow someone to walk into your studio and steal your paintings right off the wall, would you? That’s what I thought. Copyright and trademark laws were developed specifically to protect artists and art. It is time to understand those laws and to learn how to maximize on their benefits.

Under copyright law, your artwork is protected against unauthorized copying. But that only lasts for the life of the artist plus 75 years. Another facet of copyright law provides you with the right to attribution, which affords you the right to have your name on your art or to prevent non-authors from putting their names on your art. But that only lasts for the artist’s lifetime. Unfortunately, that means that copyright law will not protect your name or signature when you’re dead (a time when your art can be the most valuable). But don’t despair – trademark law is here to help.

Trademark law protects an artist’s name, signature and logo. And it can last forever. That’s why it’s vital that you take a few smart steps now, so that you can take care of your art for the future. Once you own a valid trademark, you can begin enjoying its many benefits, such as a legal presumption that you are the trademark owner, a legal right to enforce your trademark against anyone who uses the same or confusingly similar mark, and even a right to have counterfeits of your work seized and destroyed by customs.

Signatures on Art: Minimal Protection

Every artist’s signature communicates a great deal of information to art consumers. Not only does it tell art buyers who the creator is, but it also reveals the quality of the art, the history of the art, the origin of the art, the price of the art, and the investment return the art will provide. Because of the powerful messages relayed by your signature, the law regards it as a protectable trademark . . . sometimes. Regrettably, it is difficult and costly to obtain a trademark registration for your signature unless you are famous.

The reason for this obscurity is that the Trademark Office does not favor granting monopoly rights for surnames. If fictitious artist John Smith signed his oil paintings as J. Smith, and attempted to register his signature with the Trademark Office, the Trademark Office would likely refuse his application because Smith is a common last name. It would therefore be imprudent to prevent all other Smith-named artists from using their own last name on their art. If your last name is something as common as Smith, then you might even appreciate the reservation exercised by the Trademark Office. But what if your last name is unique?

In order to overcome a surname rejection like the one described above, you will need to prove that art buyers readily associate your name or signature with your specific artworks (versus artworks belonging to artists with the same name or a similar name). For the average artist, this will be a hard fact to prove because you will need to use consumer surveys as evidence, a process that is extremely costly and time-consuming. If you are a famous artist, then you will have an easier time proving this association because even those working at the Trademark Office would recognize your name. For example, renowned artist Marits Cornelis Escher was granted a trademark right to his signature for M.C. Escher without any extra proof of consumer association since he was already famous when his estate applied for the trademark.

But even if you were born into a common last name, you should not risk losing such powerful trademark rights. There are several ways to avoid dealing with a surname rejection altogether. For instance, since a pseudonym is not a surname, it is somewhat easier to register a pseudonym than your real name. One artist who applied for a trademark – in her pseudonym Ysabella – was approved simply because she used a pseudonym. Another option is to use a single name only – e.g., Smith – rather than a first initial and last name combined. The difference is that a single name will not be regarded as a surname since it can be argued that it is merely a first name, nickname, middle name, etc. Picasso, whom you may have heard of, signs his paintings with his last name only.

Article Rewriting — Legal Aspects of Rewriting and Copyright Issues

One of the questions that always crop up in case of article rewriting is whether such rewriting is infringement of copyright and violation of existing law of the land. While the question is difficult answering, it requires verification of a few important aspects.

Aspects for Consideration in Case of Rewriting Articles

Some of the aspects that require consideration in case of rewriting articles are as follows.

To decide whether there has been any copyright infringement one has to consider how the article was written;
At the same time one has to look at the objective of article rewriting in such case; and
One has to consider the ethical aspects as well.

Rewriting Contents of Others and Using as Web Content

One of the widely followed practices these days is complete rewriting of the contents of some other writer and using the same as web content. At times the writer also resorts to rewriting web content. While it is not technically or legally wrong the unethical nature of such practice cannot be overlooked.

Issue of Rewriting is Highly Controversial These Days

Issues relating to article rewriting are very controversial in these days. One of the reasons is the opposition by original writers finding their hard work going down the rewrite drain which is really frustrating experience for them. An article that was written by the writer after hours of research and efforts could be rewritten by another within a minute, suitably changing the contents and this could be very frustrating for the original writer.

Something That is Not Legally Wrong May Not Be Ethically Right

Rewriting may not be a legal fault but it could be ethically wrong.

Thousands of websites on Internet are there and they deal with the identical topics, products, or services.
For instance; there are numerous sites dealing with health and fitness issues like weight loss. Contents on many of these sites will look similar but in reality they are not.
Even when there are some contents that are results of article rewriting it cannot be proved. And unless they are proved to be copied there can be no question of copyright infringement.

Google Strictness on Use of Copied Contents On The Web

Google is very strict with sites offering copied items on the web. However, It has its own unique way of evaluation of copied contents. Even if the contents match word by word it will look at the history of the sites concerned and the one which is the oldest and normally have the largest viewer following will be considered by them as original and others who have come latter will be considered copied.

However, there is one danger in it as well. If it is the older site that has actually copied the content from the newer site, then the newer one would be undue sufferer and that once again will be unethical. Despite rewriting article resorted to by the older site, the younger site will end up losing indexing by Google. Best way out is resorting to an experienced and professional article rewriting service and work under its guidance to avoid any type of copyright infringement.